Ohio

Gov. Kasich Sticks To False, Pseudo-Christian Obamacare Rhetoric

Campaigns John Kasich
Ohio Governor John Kasich (R)

Ohio Governor John Kasich keeps repeating his false claim that expanding Medicaid would “get our money back,” his insistence that God wants more entitlement spending, and his allusions to circumventing standard legislative procedure to implement a key piece of Obamacare.

In a September 16 question and answer session with the press filmed by Youngstown Vindicator reporter Marc Kovac, the Republican governor reiterated his favorite Obamacare Medicaid expansion talking points.

Though his rhetoric is a mix of obviously untrue and simply illogical, Kasich has not been challenged by reporters who overwhelmingly support Medicaid expansion.

Having concluded months ago that billions per year in new entitlement spending is, as Kasich says, “the right thing,” the press now seems content to fight over which outlet can apply the most pressure for the Obamacare Medicaid expansion.

Asked about the possibility of expanding Medicaid by executive order, Gov. Kasich demurred, saying, “I think at the end of the day you need some sign-off from the legislature,” noting that his administration believes there are “some things that we can do to we think help them out.”

When a reporter asked whether he was concerned about the politics of championing a policy opposed by conservatives, Kasich insinuated that critics of big government are what’s wrong with America.

He added, “look, some people’s motives is not proper here, okay?”

As he has done since February, Kasich portrayed himself as above the fray of petty politics, showing generosity and compassion by making promises taxpayers cannot keep. “It’s what the Lord wants,” he asserted.

Gov. Kasich continued, “what some of ‘em lose sight of is, there isn’t anybody who’s worked harder and longer on balancing a federal budget than the people around me and I have dedicated to it.”

“We can deal with our federal budget deficit despite the fact that we’re doing something on Medicaid,” the governor said before segueing into his pitch for a federal balanced budget amendment.

Kasich dismissed speculation that calling for a balanced budget amendment is a move targeted for the 2016 presidential race; somehow, no mainstream reporter has recognized Kasich’s balanced budget talk as a transparent attempt to reclaim the mantle of fiscal conservatism he abandoned by embracing the Obamacare Medicaid expansion.

Kovac’s videos follow, accompanied by partial transcripts encompassing the remarks in question.

Gov. Kasich: “We’re continuing to work on Medicaid and you’ll be getting some information soon about some of our plans that will work in conjunction with the legislature.”

Reporter: “So do you expect it not to come through legislation, then?”

Gov. Kasich: “I’m not really gonna say anything at this point about how we’re gonna do this–”

Another Reporter: “Are you looking at the possiblity of maybe doing an executive order? Is that something you’re considering?”

Gov. Kasich: “You know, I think at the end of the day you need some sign-off from the legislature. You need to have some agreement with them in one way or another as to how, ya know, how you proceed. Because you don’t want to get yourself into a, some sort of a showdown where you run out of money and you force them — that’s not the way to do things. So, I’m still patient, and I take them at their word, but there’s also some things that we can do to we think help them out.”

[...]

Reporter: “Are you concerned about the politics at all of this, where you have tea party, conservative Republicans–”

Gov. Kasich: “No, no, I’m not — look, no, you know what, I’m not concerned about the politics, because that’s what has been our problem, not only in Ohio but in our country, for too long. We have to get our money back to help the drug-addicted, to get ‘em healed. We have to get our money back to help the mentally ill and to make sure that our working poor people, who are living in and out of the emergency room, don’t have to do that. That’s just a right — that’s just the right thing, so let the politics go where it is. I mean, you know, politics is… look, everything in our lives includes some compromise, there isn’t any question about it, and, uh — but that doesn’t concern me.”

[...]

Gov. Kasich: “It’s not about, you know, what’s the politics for me, ya know, these jobs come and go, but our lives go on – hopefully – for a long time. And it’s what we do, what we give back, it’s like I was trying to tell these seniors, ya know, give something back to you grandkids, give something – and, they want to. And that’s what we’re expected to do, and it’s what the Lord wants. So…”

Reporter: “But is it politics that’s getting in the way of Medicaid expansion and some of the other things…”

Gov. Kasich: “Ya know, I think that, to, um, to question people — look, some people’s motives is not proper here, okay? Maybe some people worry about that. But, there’s a number of concerns that people who are opposed to this have. I understand those concerns. But what they – what some of ‘em lose sight of is, there isn’t anybody who’s worked harder and longer on balancing a federal budget than the people around me and I have dedicated to it. We can deal with our federal budget deficit despite the fact that we’re doing something on Medicaid. It can be done. And you know, when I put the balanced budget amendment in, which is moving through the legislature now, I mean, some people think, ‘Well, you know, what is that, is that – is he tryin’ to go national or somethin’?’ I’m not trying to go national, I wanna get this passed and I wanna talk to other governors and I want a federal balanced budget amendment!”

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